Posted : 11 hours ago

lexrhetoricae:

mercuryacejones:

Latest positive news out of Ferguson. Community coming together.

Teachers: Heroes.

Posted : 11 hours ago

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

Posted : 14 hours ago

1956- Gordon Parks documented the everyday lives of an extended black family living in rural Alabama under Jim Crow segregation for Life magazine’s photo-essay “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” (via)

(Source: vintagegal)

Posted : 14 hours ago

psyducked:

do you ever wonder how many people have had a crush on you and never told you

Posted : 14 hours ago

http://moonjongunf.tumblr.com/post/95361849481/shakethecobwebs-people-will-always-call-out

shakethecobwebs:

people will always call out people for saying “fuck skinny bitches” but when the diet commercial comes on, when the fat jokes are being made, when conversations about how fat people are detriments to society are underway, when a size 6 expects her size 26 friend to go with…

Posted : 3 days ago
tags: #goals

(Source: brandinator)

Posted : 3 days ago

A couple reminders for everybody headed back to school

keepcalmstay-s-t-r-o-n-g:

• your mental health is more important than your grades/school work
• you are fabulous
• they’re probably not even paying attention when you give a presentation
• one friend is better than no friends
• eat a healthy lunch
• take care of yourself
• please stay safe
• your mental health is more important than your grades/school work
• I love you

Posted : 3 days ago

snarkbender:

oreyoreos:

maria-amino:

rihenna:

Rihanna as Tip in the first official Dreamworks Animation Trailer Home

I WANNA SEE LOTS OF HYPE OVER THIS MOVIE I WANNA SEE EXCITEMENT CAUSE THIS IS THE FIRST CGI MOVIE WITH A BLACK PROTAGONIST

gonna reblog so that everyone can know about this movie

freaking out about how good her hair looks

Posted : 3 days ago

cassietotallyjust:

I hope you’re having a wonderful night because despite what you believe to be true, you are so very important and loved by many ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

Posted : 4 days ago

bunmer:

hebrew-national:

thechanelmuse:

Meet Cory Nieves. He’s a dapper, 10-year old CEO of Mr. Cory’s Cookies who started his own booming cookie business in an effort to help his mom buy a car after moving from NYC to New Jersey in 2009.

What the hell!! Such a cutie

I couldn’t even tie my damn shoes at 10 and this kid has his own business

Posted : 4 days ago

anomaly1:

gang0fwolves:

king-emare:

gottabekem:

regalasfuck:

sweetheartpleasestay:

postracialcomments:

dealinghope:

mydamnblogposts:

darvinasafo:

Let’s see how many of y’all ready to show some SOLIDARITY…

Let’s make this happen!!

WE HAVE TO SPREAD THIS !!! 

Im for it

Yooooo. I’m doing this.

please do this

Okay, but can we get a list of black owned businesses in our areas?  

word^^^^

^please

There’s an app called Around the Way for iPhones and Androids that locate your nearest black owned business’ by zipcode. PLEASE SPREAD THIS!

Posted : 4 days ago

cindimayweathersson:

memewhore:

image

She cussed out the governor!
I live!

Posted : 4 days ago

childrenmilk:

whitegirlsaintshit:

sincerelysugarplum:

chickem:

"Racism in America is dead"

can someone destroy these people over twitter pls

CAN PEOPLE REBLOG THIS, PLEASE?

no souls. at all.

Someone posted a picture of a little girl :( that is extra foul

Posted : 1 week ago

journolist:

Michael Brown remembered as a ‘gentle giant’ (St. Louis Post- Dispatch)

Michael Brown posted a haunting message on Facebook last week as he prepared to enter a new phase in his life: college. “if i leave this earth today,” he wrote to a friend, “atleast youll know i care about others more then i cared about my damn self.”

Dozens arrested during protests over Ferguson police shooting (Al Jazeera America)

At least 50 were arrested in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, according to police and local media, after a second night of protests over the death of an unarmed African-American teenager shot to death by a police officer.

Police use tear gas in Ferguson, people jam church for moment of silence (St. Louis Post- Dispatch)

Tension stayed high and raw Monday as the St. Louis region waited for answers in the fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a municipal police officer.

Police use tear gas on crowd in Ferguson, Mo., protesting teen’s death (Washington Post)

For a third night, summer rage pitted the people of Ferguson against those sworn to protect them. On Saturday, officers shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. On Sunday, resident protests turned to riots, marked by looting and the burning of several local stores.

Michael Brown Shooting: Tear Gas Fired at Crowd in Ferguson (NBC News)

Fifteen arrests were made. St. Louis city alderman Antonio French posted a series of videos and pictures on Twitter documenting the police response. Young people were seen holding their hands up in the same manner that some witnesses have suggested Brown was at the time of the shooting.

Tensions in Ferguson remain ‘high and raw’ (MSNBC)

“I saw the barrel of the gun pointed at my friend,” said Dorian Johnson, 22. “Then I saw the fire come out of the barrel.” He added that “what began as an order by a police officer to ‘get the f— onto the sidewalk’ quickly escalated into a physical altercation and then, gunfire.”

FBI Investigating Ferguson Police Shooting of Teen Michael Brown (NBC News)

The FBI is opening an investigation into the shooting of unarmed Missouri teenager Mike Brown by a police officer in suburban St. Louis, officials said on Monday.

Eyewitness to Michael Brown shooting recounts his friend’s death (MSNBC)

The last moments of Michael Brown’s life were filled with shock, fear and terror, says a witness who stood just feet away as a police officer shot and killed the unarmed teen. “I saw the barrel of the gun pointed at my friend,” said Dorian Johnson, 22. “Then I saw the fire come out of the barrel.”

In defense of black rage: Michael Brown, police and the American dream (Salon)

The people of Ferguson are angry. Outraged. The officer’s story is dubious. Any black kid with sense knows it is futile to reach into an officer’s vehicle and take his gun. That story is only plausible to people who believe that black people are animals, that black men go looking for cops to pick fights with. Absurdity. Eyewitness accounts like these make far more sense.

This Is Why We’re Mad About the Shooting of Mike Brown (Jezebel)

As a black person in America, it’s getting exhausting to still have to explain, in the year 2014, your right to exist in this country. To explain that you are a human being whose value sits no lower than anyone else’s. To explain our basic humanity. And perhaps worst of all, to explain exactly why we are outraged.

#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Shows How Black People Are Portrayed in Mainstream Media (The Root)

The vicious slaying of Mike Brown by Ferguson, Mo., police has once again shown that the narrative the media paints surrounding black people in America more often than not includes depicting us as violent thugs with gang and drug affiliations. It’s safe to say that Brown has become a victim of what I like to refer to as the “Trayvon Martin effect” in the media.

Michael Brown’s Death Didn’t Happen in a Vacuum (ColorLines)

Residents of Ferguson, Missouri, the black St. Louis suburb where Brown lived and died, confronted police officers on Sunday in a scene that’s since been described by the national media as one that quickly devolved into “looting.” In photos, black residents stood in front of police with their hands up to show that they were unarmed. They chanted the slogans we’ve all become too used to over the years: “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!”

When Parenting Feels Like a Fool’s Errand: On the Death of Michael Brown. (Stacia Brown)

Did they say, “Kill the police?!” As long as that’s the way you heard it, they did. And that is what AP will wire out to every mainstream news outlet who can be bothered to report the death of another unarmed black son on a Saturday night. Their truth is not our truth.

When police departments don’t look like the cities they’re meant to protect (Washington Post)

The St. Louis suburb of Ferguson where the working-class, majority-black population has been clashing with law enforcement for the last three days has 53 commissioned police officers. According to the city’s police chief, three of them are black.

When We Are Young (Crunk Feminist Collective)

When we are young, often too young to fully understand the anxiety in their voices and the fear in their eyes, many of us listen to our parents tell us how to behave when, not if, we are stopped by the police.

Black Kids Don’t Have to Be College-Bound for Their Deaths to Be Tragic (The Root)

Missouri teen Michael Brown was unarmed when police gunned him down. We don’t need to keep talking about his college plans to communicate that his killing was dead wrong.

Michael Brown and Anti-Black Violence (The Feminist Wire)

Black life matters. Yet the police and their media support team have already begun to execute their standard playbook in the aftermath of yet another slain black youth.

National Moment of Silence Will Remember Victims of Police Brutality (Feminist Majority Foundation)

This Thursday, a National Moment of Silence will be held in cities across the country to remember the lives lost and impacted by police brutality. In the wake of two deadly police-involved shootings in less than a week, online activist Feminista Jones and individual Twitter followers were able to coordinate the event in a single day.

National Moment of Silence #NMOS14

How social media helped facilitate a national moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality, show solidarity with their families, and allow communities to come together in a moment of mourning and support.

Posted : 1 week ago